LitlCootBeauty

Lit’l Coot

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The Lit’l Coot is a wonderful little pocket cruiser, ideally suited to the waters of Puget Sound or the inside passage.

She is trailerable on a small powerboat style trailer, and compact enough to store in the average residential garage. The bilge keels allow her to beach out level and upright if caught by the tide.

A 9.9 4 cycle outboard is about ideal, economical and quiet. Unlike most small sailboats of this size, the outboard is offset to clear the rudder. The result is that on either tack, the motor is not in an ideal position. Sam has solved that problem by fitting dual rudders. Superior.

The tabernacle hinged mast makes rigging at the boat launch a breeze. Simply raise the mast, attach the forestay to the anchor roller and pin the tabernacle. Easy.

For the details, check out Sam’s design notes for the Lit’l Coot.

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Litl Coot Specifications

Length 17 ft. – 10.5 in.
Beam 6 ft. – 11 in.
Displacement 15 in.
Ballast 600 lbs.
Sail Area 156 sq. ft.
Height on Trailer 7 ft. – 6 in.
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3 thoughts on “Lit’l Coot

  1. Hi Cliff Allen here, I was interested in this design and had a few questions.
    1. Can it be rigged with a junk rig?
    2. Can this boat do any blue water sailing, i.e. say from Florida to the Bahamas?
    3. Can you give me a ROUGH estimate on cost to build your design?
    I like the Fisher 25 a lot, but due to income restraints I have to look at other avenues. I like the idea of building my own. I would be a beginner builder. Thank You
    Cliff Allen

    • Hi Cliff: We have two basic rigs for her currently the Cat/Yawl as shown and a Gaff Sloop (with the full keel design version). One could easily rig her with a junk rig and mast placement on the Cat/Yawl would be just about right for those sails, imagine junk rigging on the foremast and leave the mizzen just about as original design to help with helm balance and good manners while on a mooring or at anchor. I would most certainly choose the full keel version for anything offshore work wise, the deep keel would help with centers of Gravity and less moving and rotating gear while at sea. I would think about 10-12K in materials leaving out the sails and any engine and electronics options. About 750 hours labor to construct. I hope this helps.. regards Sam

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