Eider17

Eider

The Eider is a wonderful 17′ 3″ cabin sailboat. It is a great step up in size and function from the 15′ Nancy’s China, yet is still compact and trailerable.

Her small cabin has good room to sleep two with a bit of extra space for gear to be stowed out of the way of your unrolled sleeping bags.

The self-bailing cockpit allows her to live on her mooring throughout our rainy spring and fall (and all-to-often our summers as well).

For deeper insights on the Eider, check out Sam’s design notes.

 

Eider Specifications

Length 17 ft. – 3.75 in.
Beam 6 ft. – 11.5 in.
Draft   Up/Down 1 ft. – 7 7/8 in. / 2ft. – 11.5 in.
Displacement 1636 lbs.
Ballast 630 lbs.
Sail Area 169 sq. ft.
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3 thoughts on “Eider

  1. Hi all,

    I have two questions about the Eider sailboat, all the pictures that I have looked at on the web have confused me as to the location of the centreboard. I am aware that the early design had a long keel and I am assuming that the current plans are for the centreboard or latest design plans. The centreboard appears to be off centre to the starboard side, if so by how much? My next question is the location of the ballast, is it all in the centreboard? I am leaning toward the Eider sailboat for my next building project, I already have the plans for the Great Pelican, but like the Eider layout better, especially the self draining cockpit…………..Thanks from Kelly, Nova Scotia, Canada

  2. Hi Kelly: The new version of the Eider has a Centerboard that is just 3 inches off the centerline to the starboard side. The reason for the offset is to allow the shoe keel (hardwood with a Stainless Steel or Brass Half Oval chafe protection strip) to run continuously along the bottom and will aid in keeping stuff out of the bottom of the Centerboard Trunk when beaching her (as might be the case in a centerline trunk placement). The slight offset also aids in entering the cabin keeping a slightly wider place for your feet along the aft end of the trunk..
    The ballast is mostly all in the bilge of her being lead shot and lead pigs set in epoxy solid. The centerboard only has enough ballast to keep it from floating up. I have never been a fan of a heavily ballasted centerboard as when grounding accidentally the force driving the heavier board up and into the trunk might be exaggerated. With the slightly ballasted board those features typically don’t end up in damage.

  3. Thanks Sam,
    That answers my questions nicely, I think this is the boat for me. I am rebuilding a 12 foot Pelican in my shop this winter and will sail this boat while I build the Eider. Just trying to keep busy in my retirement years………………Kelly, Nova Scotia, Canada

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